Your Sig File Says So Much

signature
You’ve read the title to this blog post and now you are thinking:

  • My sig file is perfect – it says just what it should say about me.

  • My sig file is just fine – it says all my company will let me say.

  • My sig file is OK – it has all of the info I think you need.

  • Sig file? We don’t need no stinkin’ sig files!

  • Sig file? What the heck are you smoking?

  • Sig file? I should have a sig file?

OK, let me spell it out for you. “Sig file” is an old, old term, from way back when we used a separate file for this purpose. Today, it’s just called a signature – simple stuff, right? If you want to know how to create a signature for your email, click this link to my YouTube channel, where you’ll find videos demonstrating this feature on a few email platforms.

This article is in response to a message I received from my Jean’s Growth Gems Memo email subscription. In her message, she laments the fact that a colleague she hadn’t spoken to for some time did not include his phone number at the end of his message. Don’t let this happen to your email recipients!

Do you like being contacted by others? Do you make it easy or hard for people to get in touch with you? For example, do you have a signature line on your emails that provides your name, phone number, email, etc., or do you just have your name? It seems obvious, but a lot of people do not have their contact information on their emails. I wanted to connect with a colleague that I haven’t spoken to in over 6 months. I couldn’t find his phone number. I went to his email and you know what there was…his name. No way to reach him by phone. How I wished that he had included his phone number in his email signature line.
– Jean Oursler of http://www.thebusinessgrowthco.com/

Your sig file, or your “Signature,” as it’s called in Gmail and elsewhere these days, is whatever you’ve decided to include at the end of your email messages. This is often a personal choice, or it may be something that is mandated and tightly controlled by your company’s policies. If you do have the luxury of a choice about this valuable bit of information, I have some suggestions for you.

  • First suggestion: Don’t go without one!
  • Second suggestion: Provide, at a minimum, your name and phone number. We already have your email address, although, it would be nice if you put it here for easy copy and paste access.
  • Third: If you have a website and like the idea that someone might land on your site, by all means, include a URL. If you want to get fancy about this and add an image or a hyper-linked image, oh, please, please do! Fancy is better.
  • Fourth: If you choose to provide no information in your signature block, I may still call, but it will be after cursing a bit about having to go look up your contact information (if I have it.)

Here are some signature samples:

One is from my Outlook email client, one from my Google email, and one from one of my business associates:

I’ve left this at full size, so you can really see what it says.
Since I’m the webmaster for ACT I and for DNP, they are prominently featured in my email messages, in the sig file.MySigFile625

Here’s how it looks in Gmail:

MySigFileGoogle

And, here is one from Dominique Fruchtman, of Desert Cow Computers. She uses a cool tool to provide the presentation of the framing and the button links in her signature file. To learn more about this, you can go to myesig.com for more information,
or contact Dom directly, for her help.

DomSigFile625